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Category: History

ERIC HARTMANN, GERMAN WAR ACE

ERIC HARTMANN, GERMAN WAR ACE

Eric Hartmann was a German fighter pilot during World War II and was the highest scoring fighter ace in the history of aerial warfare. He flew in 1404 combat missions and engaged in aerial combat 825 times while serving as a fighter with the Luftwaffe. His record was 352 aerial victories involving shooting down an enemy aircraft. At the same time Hartman forced to crash land his fighter 14 times. However this was not due to being shot down or forced…

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THE SKYSCRAPER THAT DIDN’T BLOW OVER

THE SKYSCRAPER THAT DIDN’T BLOW OVER

The Citigroup Center is a skyscraper located on Lexington Avenue in New York City. It is one of the ten tallest skyscrapers in New York City. Standing 59 fours high is 915 feet into the sky. The structural engineer was William LeMessuirier (pronounced "La Measure"). The building has a very distinctive 45° angle and it rests upon four massive 114 feet tall stilts located at the center of each side rather than the corners. This unique design was required because it had to be…

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WILLIIAM JENNINGS BRYAN SPEECHES IN WASHINGTON IN 1909

WILLIIAM JENNINGS BRYAN SPEECHES IN WASHINGTON IN 1909

There is a Washington State history site, www.historylink.org which is a wonderful source  of interesting stories of history. One of articles is about talks by the famous William Jennings Bryan in Seattle. http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=8663  So, who was Bryan? William Jennings Bryan was a prominent American politician from the 1890's until his death in 1925. This is a man who ran three times, unsuccessfully, as the Democratic candidate for presidency of the United States and who prosecuted John Scopes in the famous "Scopes trial of the century." …

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NICHOLAS JAMES PETRISH 1937 – DEC 19, 2011

NICHOLAS JAMES PETRISH 1937 – DEC 19, 2011

Nick Petrish died in Anacortes on December 19, 2011. Nick and I were friends since our days as grade school students at the Whitney Grade school in Anacortes over 70 years ago. We also went through Junior High and High School together. His father "Big" Nick operated a salmon fishing boat the Traveler in the summer and Nick fished with his dad in Alaska while I fished there on other seine boats. At Anacortes, we played on the same football and…

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George Washington & Leeches

George Washington & Leeches

Bloodletting was commonly practiced in the United States during the time of George Washington. It played a major role in the death of the father of our country who died at his home on December 14, 1799. The 67 year old Washington had developed a fever and laryngitis in the middle of the night. In the morning, his doctor, Doctor James Craik was summoned and Dr. George Rawlins arrived to care for him until Craik could get there. Dr. Rawlins…

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THE LAST SHOTS OF THE CIVIL WAR WERE FIRED IN ALASKA

THE LAST SHOTS OF THE CIVIL WAR WERE FIRED IN ALASKA

Did you know that last shots of the American Civil War did not take place in the continental United States but rather in Alaska? It's true. http://www.nps.gov/cwindepth/StateByState/Alaska.html It was about hundred and 50 years ago that supposedly neutral Great Britain secretly transferred to the Confederate Navy at a rendezvous off the coast of Africa a ship, the Sea King, that was renamed the Shenandoah. Built in Great Britain as a supposed troop transport, Great Britain, who claimed to be neutral in the war, constructed…

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IN FLANDERS FIELDS

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

I was coming out of a store in my home town of Gig Harbor when I was stopped by middle-aged man who was with a couple of other men selling poppies to support veterans. I told him I would contribute if he could tell me why we celebrated Veterans Day with poppies. He paused and told me that he thought it had to do something with flowers during the Civil War. I gave him money and told he had failed the test. I said it…

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OUR HISTORY OF NUCLEAR POWER

OUR HISTORY OF NUCLEAR POWER

The recent nuclear disaster in Japan and the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in the Ukraine are certainly not the first nuclear disasters. But, Chernobyl was the worst nuclear accident in  history. The attempt to contain the  contamination involved some 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion Rubles which crippled the soviet economy. We had our own nuclear diaster in March of 1979 when a nuclear power plant failure happened at Three Mile Island in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There was radiation contamination…

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A STRANGE STORY ABOUT A LAWYER WHO DIED WHILE DEFENDING HIS CLIENT

A STRANGE STORY ABOUT A LAWYER WHO DIED WHILE DEFENDING HIS CLIENT

This is a an unusual true story from history about a lawyer who died while defending a client in a murder case under peculiar  circumstances. Clement Vallandigham was an Ohio politician and lawyer. He was the leader of the copperhead faction of the antiwar Democrats during the American civil war. He was a strong supporter of constitutional state’s rights. He believed the states had the right to withdraw from the union and was anti Lincoln. During the Civil War he…

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PAUL ALLAN & THE PIG WAR

PAUL ALLAN & THE PIG WAR

Allan Island is located just west of Fidalgo island. It is a 292 acre private island. It was named by Charles Wilkes who led the first United States Navy expedition assigned to explore the Pacific Ocean in 1838. He surveyed Puget Sound and named dozens of landmarks including Elliott Bay. Wilkes obsessive behavior and harsh code of discipline was the inspiration for Herman Melville's Ahab in the book Moby Dick. Wilkes named it in 1841 after Capt. William H Allen…

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